Can You Give a Dog Benadryl – A Guide for Dosing at Home

Can You Give a Dog Benadryl – A Guide for Dosing at Home

Babies, dogs, and cats have different tolerances for medications. Benadryl is an antihistamine that works by blocking the effects of natural chemical histamines in your body. It’s used to relieve allergies and can be given to pets at home. However, it should only be given with instructions from a veterinarian or doctor because there are some risks associated with its use on animals. This article will cover how much benadryl you should give your dog based on their weight as well as what symptoms might indicate they need more medication.

What is Benadryl and why do I need it?

Benadryl is a medication that can be used to provide quick relief from certain symptoms in dogs. It helps by blocking the effects of natural chemical histamines and relieves allergies in animals at home.

Histamine is produced during an allergic response, which causes skin irritation such as hives or itchy eyes and nose; Benadryl blocks this effect on your body so you don’t experience those reactions.

The antihistamine also reduces swelling (which would cause sneezing) and redness caused by allergy-related inflammation in order to help relieve some symptoms like watery eyes, runny nose, nasal congestion, itchiness around the mouth/throat area, etc.– all common signs of allergies for humans as well as pets.

The medication is used on animals, but requires instructions from a veterinarian or doctor because there are some risks associated with its use. It’s important to only give the right dose and never exceed it at any time – an overdose could be life-threatening depending on your size/weight and other factors like age/health condition.

How Do You Give a Dose to Your Dog at Home?

Dogs should only be given Benadryl with instructions from a veterinarian or doctor because there are some risks associated with its use. However, it’s important to know that when you give the medication at home, they need to take about one mg per pound of bodyweight for mild symptoms and two mg per pound for severe symptoms.

This means your dog would need half of their dose if they weigh less than ten pounds, ¼ of the dose if under 20 lbs., ⅛th of the dosage if between 40-50 lbs., etc.– but never exceed what is instructed on how much Benadryl you can give them without consulting first.

For example: If your pup weighs 33 kg (71.68 pounds), they would need to take about 50 mg of the medication.

For severe symptoms, administer two milligrams per pound every eight hours for a maximum of five doses in 24 hours.

Pets with liver disease or heart problems should not be given Benadryl unless instructed by your veterinarian because it can cause more damage and even death if overdosed on these types of animals.

As mentioned before, dogs need half their dose when under ten pounds; so for example: A dog weighing less than 15 lbs will require one quarter dosage which is 25mg rather than 125mg.

Dosage

If you have a pet that weighs less than 15 pounds, give them 25mg of benadryl. If they weigh more, refer to the table below for appropriate dosage amounts based on weight (for pets under 20lbs, ¼ dose; for pets between 40-50 lbs., ⅛th dose). Never ever exceed two milligrams per pound without consulting your veterinarian first! Always make sure to follow instructions carefully when giving Benadryl at home in order not to overdose or do any harm.

Symptoms and duration of symptoms will vary with each animal and individual situation so always consult a vet before administering medication if there is any uncertainty. Mild Symptoms: One mg per pound every six hours for a maximum of three doses in 24 hours.

Severe Symptoms

Two mg per pound every eight hours for up to five doses, not more than once every 12 hours. Duration of symptoms will vary with each animal and individual situation so always consult your veterinarian before administering medication if there is any uncertainty! Mild Symptoms: One dose usually lasts one day but can last two days depending on the severity of symptoms; Severe Symptoms: 

You may need to administer another dose after six-eight hours as severe reactions could persist longer due to increased inflammation occurring from an allergic reaction. If you’ve determined it necessary, dogs should take Benadryl at home until they recover from their allergies or other related symptoms (typically about 48-72 hours).

Different Ways to Give Benadryl

  • Pills can be administered by hand or with a pill popper, but it’s important not to crush them in order for the drug to work properly. If you are using a tablet, make sure that they have been fully chewed and swallowed so it will enter your system more quickly.
  • Liquid form of benadryl also exists which is usually mixed with food like peanut butter or wet pet food (not dry kibble) as some pets may refuse eating when sick. Your veterinarian should have instructed on how much liquid medication per pound per dose before administering at home. The dosing instructions depend on weight because heavier animals require higher doses than lighter animals.
  • A dropper or syringe can be used to administer liquid medication, but always make sure you’re using the correct dosage of Benadryl for your pet!
  • Inhalers: If a dog has asthma and they are having an allergic reaction that is causing difficulty breathing, try giving them their dose in inhaler form so they don’t have to swallow anything. This will allow for faster distribution through the respiratory system while also allowing more air to flow which may help open up bronchial tubes during an attack.

When administering this way, it’s important not to exceed two milligrams per pound without consulting a veterinarian because too much benadryl could harm the animal (especially if they are already on other asthma medications).

  • Paste: For pets that can’t swallow, a paste form of benadryl may be the best option. A veterinarian will prepare this for you and instruct you how much to use per dose based on your pet’s weight. It is not recommended for animals under five pounds as it could cause choking or breathing difficulties due to its thickness in their throat; however, if they have been instructed by their vet than it should be safe at half dosage (one mg per pound) every six hours.
  • Dried powder form: This type of Benadryl must be mixed with water before administering and dosed according to weight again because heavier animals require higher doses than light ones.

Side effects of Benadryl in dogs include 

  • Drowsiness, lethargy and fatigue 
  • Nausea or vomiting (rarely)
  • Loss of appetite

Side effects in dogs may be more likely to occur if the animal is taking other medications with Benadryl or has a pre-existing condition. If you notice any side effects after your pet has taken medication, contact their veterinarian immediately so they can help assess what’s wrong.

Side effect duration will vary depending on each individual situation! Symptoms should go away within 48 hours unless otherwise instructed by a vet. It’s recommended that during this time no food or water is given as it could make symptoms worse for some animals. Rarely nausea might persist for up to three days.

Can You Give a Dog Benadryl?

Yes, but always consult your vet first! The dosing amount will depend on the size of your pet and their weight. Heavier animals require higher doses than lighter ones because they have more mass that needs to be taken care of. If you suspect an allergic reaction in your animal or if they are having difficulty breathing due to asthma attack this may warrant you giving them their dose in inhaler form. 

Instead which would allow for faster distribution through the respiratory system while also allowing more air flow which can help open bronchial tubes during an attack. 

Final Thought

It is important to know the difference between a dog’s weight and dosage. When in doubt, call your veterinarian for advice on how much Benadryl you should give your pet. A quick Google search shows that it’s safe for people with allergies to take benadryl as long as they don’t experience side effects like sleepiness, but there are some dangers for animals who may react differently than humans do when taking this drug. 

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